Pasture

Pasture Renovation

Managing Pastures for
Maximum Production


Pasture Establishment, Renovation, and Maintenance

Annual Warm-Season Grasses

Small Grains

 

 
         
         
       
 

Pasture Renovation
Pasture renovation can be accomplished by either sowing in late winter and allowing the freezing and thawing to cover seed, or by discing the ground lightly. The dic method should be use when seeding is done later, or when there is a limited amount of bare ground showing. Seed must come in contact with the ground. Soil tests should be taken as early as possible. In fact, the best time to take soil samples is in the late fall. In spring, when the young plants begin to appear, the older and taller grasses and legumes should not be allowed to overshadow the younger plants. However, extensive grazing should not be practiced. As no-till seeding increases, there are several rules to follow for your practice to work. Try to disturb the soil or existing stand as little as possible. If weeds are a problem use the correct herbicide to eliminate weeds. No-til seeding can be done in late winter, spring or late fall. Use adequate amounts of lime and fertilizer. Use high quality seeds.
 

 
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  Managing Pastures for Maximum Production
In order to get the maximum production from pastures, we need to harvest them in their entirety and then move the animals to another pasture, allowing about a month for recovery of the first pasture. In order to practice this method of harvesting, we need calculate the number of animal units per acre for quick harvest early in the season allow for more acreage as production declines.

For example, grass harvested (fed) at full growth is better feed than when allowed to mature. Thus, 5 acres harvested in 10 days will provide more and better feed than 5 acres harvested over a 20-30 day period.
 
 
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  Pasture Establishment, Renovation, and Maintenance
A pasture's present condition as well as its anticipated use should determine weather to reestablish, renovate, or leave a pasture as it is. Most pasture can be improved without renovation simply by proper liming, fertilization, and grazing management. But if a pasture is to be reseeded or renovated, they should be done properly to ensure adequate results for your investment. Remember that the costs of establishment cannot by justified if pasture are not going to be managed properly.
 
 
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  Annual Warm-Season Grasses
Sudangrass or sorghum and sudangrass hybrids are ready for grazing about 6 weeks after seeding. These must be grazed rotationally (2 weeks or less at a time) to avoid prussic acid (HCN) poisoning. To prevent animal from grazing large amounts of new growth high in HCN. Grazing should not be started on drought-stressed re-growth of these grasses until the stress is relieved. Frosted forage should not be grazed for a week after frosting. These practices also help reduce danger of HCN poisoning.
 
 
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  Small Grains
Small grains such as oats, rye, wheat, or triticale can provide late fall and early spring grazing. Other forage resource, such as corn stalks grazed after harvest, and the use of aftermath hay, can be planned into a full-season grazing program.
 
 
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Clark Seeds Inc  -  1467 Seven Hickories Road  -  Clayton, DE 19938  -  Phone: (302) 653-9249

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